YouTube channel about atomic elements

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YouTube channel about atomic elements

Post by Ciaolo on Fri Oct 20, 2017 1:53 am

Hi everyone.

I found and subscribed to an interesting channel with videos about experiments on various atomic elements.

This is the link: https://www.youtube.com/user/TheThoisoi2

I suggest you watch some of them and we can discuss if we find something important for Miles theory. Just post a link and a time, and your thoughts.

I hope this leads to something good!

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Re: YouTube channel about atomic elements

Post by Cr6 on Tue Oct 24, 2017 10:56 pm

Thanks for sharing Ciaolo.

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Re: YouTube channel about atomic elements

Post by Ciaolo on Sun Feb 18, 2018 11:46 am

I was reading some Mathis chemistry papers lately and I started wandering if molecules and atoms with certain atomic numbers can be equivalent.

I’m quite ignorant about chemistry actually but what I mean is, for example a molecule with 4 atoms of hydrogen could be the same as an atom of beryllium.

Just get a molecule and sum its atoms’ atomic numbers and that molecule should be the same as an atom with that total atomic number.

I also have a question. Let’s take hydrogen, is it always a proton + an electron or it could be a neutron + an electron?

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Re: YouTube channel about atomic elements

Post by Nevyn on Sun Feb 18, 2018 6:25 pm

Not quite that simple. Miles has shown that it is not about the number of nucleons, but the charge channels that they form. The nucleon count does play a part because they provide charge strength and create the channels but most of the effects are caused by the charge entering or leaving the atom.

Hydrogen is always a proton because it needs the equatorial charge of that proton. The neutron does not provide that and the electron is too weak to make a difference by itself. To be honest, the need for an electron in hydrogen bothers me a bit. Is it absolutely required? If so, then a hydrogen atom is weaker than a proton because that electron is going to block some charge from entering one of the poles. A neutron on the other pole might help to balance it out a bit.
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Re: YouTube channel about atomic elements

Post by Ciaolo on Mon Feb 26, 2018 2:04 pm

Hello.

I found this video in that channel, it’s about Beryllium:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WHsLEmuFDrY

Beryllium is made of 2 stacked alphas, and in 2 experiments it is dissolved and in both Helium is produced (a single Alpha). Some of you who are more expert of chemistry can try to explain the 2 reactions when this happens?

I just want to understand, not to compare with mainstream chemistry which is just maths and wild guesses.

Thanks

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Re: YouTube channel about atomic elements

Post by Nevyn on Tue Feb 27, 2018 6:21 pm

I don't have time to look at the video at the moment, but I can make some educated guesses.

Beryllium is 2 Alphas sandwiched on top of each other. That is, the south pole of the top one is connected to the north pole of the bottom one. They are linked by the through-charge that runs through the north-south channel that connects them.

Helium is a single Alpha. So Beryllium is just 2 Helium atoms connected to each other. That explains why the output of these experiments is Helium. The remaining question is how might one go about breaking Beryllium?

The only thing we can really do is disrupt that north-south through-charge. That is what is holding it together so we need to break that link. There are a few ways that this could be done. Extreme cold will deplete most charge from the area and so that through-charge will be reduced enough to let the Alphas move apart. We could introduce a cross stream of charge such as an electric current, east-west for example, that overwhelms the north-south charge channel. We could also add in a catalyst atom or molecule that either soaks up the ambient charge, starving Beryllium, or has a strong charge output that will interrupt that north-south through-charge. We would be looking for an atom/molecule that has a strong equatorial charge emission for this method. Acids and Bases are often employed for this as they have very strong charge streams.

Now you just need to figure out which methods are applicable for each experiment or if there is something that I have missed.
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Re: YouTube channel about atomic elements

Post by LongtimeAirman on Tue Feb 27, 2018 6:26 pm

.
Hey Ciaolo, I’m rather deficient in this area so I suppose I should make an effort. For both our sakes, I hope Nevyn answers.

Beryllium’s (Be) form (or any atom’s form) is dependent on the local charge field. Nevyn’s Atomic Viewer 0.9 https://www.nevyns-lab.com/mathis/app/AtomicViewer/AtomicViewer.php shows Be as two stacked alphas (no neutrons between the atom's two center-most protons). It seems to me that that form can only exist under extremely low or benign charge conditions. I find it hard to believe Be can join other elements in a two alpha form; instead, I believe Be is a single alpha (two neutrons between the atom's two center protons) and single protons (with neutrons) at both north and south alpha poles. Instead of breaking up into two Helium atoms, the second Be form would then be expected to breakup into a Helium and two Hydrogens and two neutrons.

When Beryllium is placed into the reaction solution – base or acid – the charge channeled through the Be atoms is greatly increased to match the charge flows and ionization levels existent between the much larger Oxygen, Sodium, and Chlorine atoms. In those solutions and at those charge levels Be provides a good source of He and H for the creation of larger molecules.

Does that sound reasonable to you?

Ah, good, Nevyn's posted!
.

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