Partial List of Superconductors to Build Out

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Partial List of Superconductors to Build Out

Post by Cr6 on Wed Apr 18, 2018 8:39 pm

Found a collection in a few different papers. There might be a single long list somewhere on the internet nothing came up for it.

I'm looking at building these out with just picture diagrams from Miles Mathis's atomic structures in Nevyn's Periodic Table.

Partial List of Superconductors
https://www.nevyns-lab.com/mathis/app/mbl/mbl.html?mbl=(SnPb0.5ln0.5)Ba4Tm6Cu8O22
#   -    Formula                                               Link to Nevyn's Molecular Bonding Language Engine      
1  -     (SnPb0.5ln0.5)Ba4Tm6Cu8O22  -     (SnPb0.5ln0.5)Ba4Tm6Cu8O22
2  -     (SnPbO.5lnO.5)Ba4Tm5Cu7O20  -     (SnPbO.5lnO.5)Ba4Tm5Cu7O20
3  -     (SnTiO.5Pb0.5)Ba4Tm3Cu5O16  -     (SnTiO.5Pb0.5)Ba4Tm3Cu5O16
4  -     (Ti4Ba)Ba2Mg2Cu7O13  -     (Ti4Ba)Ba2Mg2Cu7O13
5  -     (Ti4Ba)Ba2MgCu8O13  -     (Ti4Ba)Ba2MgCu8O13
6  -     (Ti4Ba)Ba4Ca2Cu10O2  -     (Ti4Ba)Ba4Ca2Cu10O2
7  -     (Ti4Ba)Ba4Ca2Cu7O13  -     (Ti4Ba)Ba4Ca2Cu7O13
8  -     (Ti4Pb)Ba2Mg2Cu7O13  -     (Ti4Pb)Ba2Mg2Cu7O13
9  -     (Ti4Pb)Ba2MqCu8O13  -     (Ti4Pb)Ba2MqCu8O13
10  -     (Ti5Pb2)Ba2Mg2Cu9O17  -     (Ti5Pb2)Ba2Mg2Cu9O17
11  -     (TiCd0.5ln0.5)Ba4TmCaCu4O2  -     (TiCd0.5ln0.5)Ba4TmCaCu4O2
12  -     (TMTSF)2PF6  -     (TMTSF)2PF6
13  -     BaTi2Pb2O  -     BaTi2Pb2O
14  -     AuIn2O3  -     AuIn2O3
15  -     AuTe2Se4/3  -     AuTe2Se4/3
16  -     Ba12ZnO13  -     Ba12ZnO13
17  -     BaFe1.8Co0.2As2  -     BaFe1.8Co0.2As2
18  -     BaSr2CaCu4O8  -     BaSr2CaCu4O8
19  -     BaTi2Bi2O  -     BaTi2Bi2O
20  -     BaTi2Sb2O  -     BaTi2Sb2O
21  -     BaTiO  -     BaTiO
22  -     Bi2Sr2CaCu2O  -     Bi2Sr2CaCu2O
23  -     Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8  -     Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8
24  -     Bi2Sr2TeCu3O8  -     Bi2Sr2TeCu3O8
25  -     BiPbSr2Ca2Cu3O10  -     BiPbSr2Ca2Cu3O10
26  -     BiS2  -     BiS2
27  -     BiSnBa4TmCaCu4O14  -     BiSnBa4TmCaCu4O14
28  -     BMg2O2  -     BMg2O2
29  -     CaKFe4As4  -     CaKFe4As4
30  -     Cd2CaCu3O6  -     Cd2CaCu3O6
31  -     Cd3CaCu4O8  -     Cd3CaCu4O8
32  -     CdCaCu2O4  -     CdCaCu2O4
33  -     CdCaMg2O2  -     CdCaMg2O2
34  -     CdNbBa9Cu10O20  -     CdNbBa9Cu10O20
35  -     CdSMgos  -     CdSMgos
36  -     Cu2M9O3  -     Cu2M9O3
37  -     Cu3MgO4  -     Cu3MgO4
38  -     CuMgO2  -     CuMgO2
--   -       DyBa2Cu3O7   -     DyBa2Cu3O7
39  -     FePSr2ScO3  -     FePSr2ScO3
40  -     FeSe  -     FeSe
41  -     Ga2Sr4Tm2CaCu5O2  -     Ga2Sr4Tm2CaCu5O2
42  -     Ga2Sr4Y2CaCu5O2  -     Ga2Sr4Y2CaCu5O2
43  -     GaBa2O2  -     GaBa2O2
44  -     GaSr2(CaO5TmO.5)Cu2O7  -     GaSr2(CaO5TmO.5)Cu2O7
45  -     HgBaCaCu  -     HgBaCaCu
46  -     HgBaCaCuO  -     HgBaCaCuO
47  -     In4Sn2Ba2MnCu7O14  -     In4Sn2Ba2MnCu7O14
48  -     In4Sn2Ba2TiCu7O14  -     In4Sn2Ba2TiCu7O14
49  -     In5Ba4SiCu8O16  -     In5Ba4SiCu8O16
50  -     In5Sn2Ba2SiCu8O16  -     In5Sn2Ba2SiCu8O16
51  -     In6Sn2Ba2SiCu9O13  -     In6Sn2Ba2SiCu9O13
52  -     In7Sn2Ba2SiCu10O20  -     In7Sn2Ba2SiCu10O20
53  -     LaOFeAs  -     LaOFeAs
54  -     LaBaCa2Cu4O2  -     LaBaCa2Cu4O2
55  -     LBCO  -     LBCO
56  -     LnFeAsOF  -     LnFeAsOF
57  -     MnTiO3  -     MnTiO3
58  -     MoS28  -     MoS28
59  -     NbBa9Cu10O20  -     NbBa9Cu10O20
60  -     NbSe27  -     NbSe27
61  -     NbTi  -     NbTi
62  -     NdO07F03BiS2  -     NdO07F03BiS2
63  -     Pb3MgOS  -     Pb3MgOS
64  -     Pb3Sn3Sr8Ca4Cu10O30  -     Pb3Sn3Sr8Ca4Cu10O30
65  -     Pb3Sr4Ca3Cu6O2  -     Pb3Sr4Ca3Cu6O2
66  -     PCCO  -     PCCO
67  -     PbGaSr4YCaCu4O2  -     PbGaSr4YCaCu4O2
68  -     Pr2CeCuO4  -     Pr2CeCuO4
69  -     ScBa2O2  -     ScBa2O2
70  -     SmFeAsO1  -     SmFeAsO1
71  -     Sn1.4ln0.6Ba4Tm5Cu7O20  -     Sn1.4ln0.6Ba4Tm5Cu7O20
72  -     Sn10SbTe4Ba2MnCu16O32  -     Sn10SbTe4Ba2MnCu16O32
73  -     Sn10ShTe9Ba2MnCu21042  -     Sn10ShTe9Ba2MnCu21042
74  -     Sn11SbTe10Ba2VMg23O46  -     Sn11SbTe10Ba2VMg23O46
75  -     Sn11SbTe10Ba2VZMg22O46  -     Sn11SbTe10Ba2VZMg22O46
76  -     Sn12SbTe11Ba2WMg24O50  -     Sn12SbTe11Ba2WMg24O50
77  -     Sn3Ba4Ca2Cu7O2  -     Sn3Ba4Ca2Cu7O2
78  -     Sn3Ba4Im3Cu6O2  -     Sn3Ba4Im3Cu6O2
79  -     Sn3Ba4Y2Cu5O2  -     Sn3Ba4Y2Cu5O2
80  -     Sn3BaBCa4Cu11O2  -     Sn3BaBCa4Cu11O2
81  -     Sn3Sb3Ba2MnCu7O14  -     Sn3Sb3Ba2MnCu7O14
82  -     Sn4Ba4(Tm2Y)Cu7O18  -     Sn4Ba4(Tm2Y)Cu7O18
83  -     Sn4Ba4(YTm)Cu6O16  -     Sn4Ba4(YTm)Cu6O16
84  -     Sn4Ba41m2CaCu7O2  -     Sn4Ba41m2CaCu7O2
85  -     Sn4Ba4CaTmCu4O2  -     Sn4Ba4CaTmCu4O2
86  -     Sn4Ba4Tm3Cu7O2  -     Sn4Ba4Tm3Cu7O2
87  -     Sn4Sb4Ba2MnMg9O18  -     Sn4Sb4Ba2MnMg9O18
88  -     Sn4Te4Ba2MnMg9O18  -     Sn4Te4Ba2MnMg9O18
89  -     Sn5InBa4Ca2Cu11O2  -     Sn5InBa4Ca2Cu11O2
90  -     Sn5lnBa4Ca2Cu10O2  -     Sn5lnBa4Ca2Cu10O2
91  -     Sn5SbSBa2MnCM  -     Sn5SbSBa2MnCM
92  -     Sn5Te5Ba2VMg11O22  -     Sn5Te5Ba2VMg11O22
93  -     Sn6Ba4Ca2Cu10O2  -     Sn6Ba4Ca2Cu10O2
94  -     Sn6Sb6Ba2MnCu13O26  -     Sn6Sb6Ba2MnCu13O26
95  -     Sn7Te7Ba2MnCu15030  -     Sn7Te7Ba2MnCu15030
96  -     Sn8SbTe4Ba2MnCu14O28  -     Sn8SbTe4Ba2MnCu14O28
97  -     Sn9SbTe3Ba2MnCu14O28  -     Sn9SbTe3Ba2MnCu14O28
98  -     Sn9SbTe4Ba2MnCu15O30  -     Sn9SbTe4Ba2MnCu15O30
99  -     Sn9SbTe8Ba2MnCu19O38  -     Sn9SbTe8Ba2MnCu19O38
100  -     Sn9Te3Ba2MnCu13O26  -     Sn9Te3Ba2MnCu13O26
101  -     Sn9SbTe7Ba2MnCu17O34  -     Sn9ShTe7Ba2MnCu17O34
102  -     Sn9SbTe6Ba2MnCu15030  -     Sn9ShTe6Ba2MnCu15030
103  -     Sr2ScFePO3  -     Sr2ScFePO3
104  -     Sr2CaO3  -     Sr2CaO3
105  -     Sr3CaO4  -     Sr3CaO4
106  -     Sr7Ti6O19  -     Sr7Ti6O19
107  -     SrAuSi3  -     SrAuSi3
108  -     SrCaMg2O2  -     SrCaMg2O2
109  -     SrCaO2  -     SrCaO2
110  -     TaBa9Cu10O20  -     TaBa9Cu10O20
111  -     TaSi2O2  -     TaSi2O2
112  -     TeBa10Cu11O22  -     TeBa10Cu11O22
113  -     TeBa3Cu4O2  -     TeBa3Cu4O2
114  -     TeBa7Cu8O17  -     TeBa7Cu8O17
115  -     TeBa7Cu8O17  -     TeBa7Cu8O17
116  -     TeCaBa4Cu6O14  -     TeCaBa4Cu6O14
117  -     ThCr2Si2  -     ThCr2Si2
118  -     Ti2Ba2TeCu3O8  -     Ti2Ba2TeCu3O8
119  -     Ti2Ba2YCu2O6  -     Ti2Ba2YCu2O6
120  -     Ti5Ba4SiCu8O16  -     Ti5Ba4SiCu8O16
121  -     Ti5Pb2Ba2Mg2.SCu8.SO17  -     Ti5Pb2Ba2Mg2.SCu8.SO17
122  -     Ti5Pb2Ba2MgCu10O17  -     Ti5Pb2Ba2MgCu10O17
123  -     Ti5Pb2Ba2Si2.5Cu8.5O17  -     Ti5Pb2Ba2Si2.5Cu8.5O17
124  -     Ti5Pb2Ba2SiCu8O16  -     Ti5Pb2Ba2SiCu8O16
125  -     Ti5Sn2Ba2SiCu8O16  -     Ti5Sn2Ba2SiCu8O16
126  -     Ti7Sn2Ba2MnCu10O20  -     Ti7Sn2Ba2MnCu10O20
127  -     Ti7Sn2Ba2SiCu10O20  -     Ti7Sn2Ba2SiCu10O20
128  -     Ti7Sn2Ba2TiCu10O20  -     Ti7Sn2Ba2TiCu10O20
129  -     TiBa2O2  -     TiBa2O2
130  -     TiBa7Cu8O16  -     TiBa7Cu8O16
131  -     TiBa7M98O16  -     TiBa7M98O16
132  -     TiBa9Cu10O20  -     TiBa9Cu10O20
133  -     TiMg2O2  -     TiMg2O2
134  -     Ti5Ba4Ca2Cu10O2  -     Ti5Ba4Ca2Cu10O2
135  -     Ti6Ba4SiCu9O18  -     Ti6Ba4SiCu9O18
136  -     TiBa4TmCaCu5O2  -     TiBa4TmCaCu5O2
137  -     TiSnBa4Y2Cu4O2  -     TiSnBa4Y2Cu4O2
138  -     Tm2SiO2  -     Tm2SiO2
139  -     Tm2YO4.5  -     Tm2YO4.5
140  -     Tm3YO6  -     Tm3YO6
141  -     TmYO3  -     TmYO3
142  -     VBa9Cu10O20  -     VBa9Cu10O20
143  -     Y2SnBa4Cu5O2  -     Y2SnBa4Cu5O2
144  -     Y2Ba1IJCu12O25  -     Y2Ba1IJCu12025
145  -     Y2BaSCu7O2  -     Y2BaSCu7O2
146  -     Y2BaSCu8O17  -     Y2BaSCu8O17
147  -     Y2CaBa4Cu7O16  -     Y2CaBa4Cu7O16
148  -     Y3Ba5Cu8O2  -     Y3Ba5Cu8O2
149  -     Y3CaBa4Cu8O18  -     Y3CaBa4Cu8O18
150  -     Y3Fe2(FeO4)3  -     Y3Fe2(FeO4)3
151  -     YBa2Cu3O7  -     YBa2Cu3O7
152  -     YBa2Cu3O7  -     YBa2Cu3O7
153  -     YBa2Mg3O2  -     YBa2Mg3O2
154  -     YBa2O2  -     YBa2O2
155  -     Y3Ba4Cu7O16  -     Y3Ba4Cu7O16
156  -     YCaBa3Cu5O11  -     YCaBa3Cu5O11
157  -     Y0.5Gd0.SBa2Cu3O7  -     YO.5Gd0.5Ba2Cu3O7
158  -     Y0.5Lu0.SBa2Cu3O7  -     YO.5Lu0.5Ba2Cu3O7
159  -     YPtBi  -     YPtBi
160  -     YSrCa2Cu4O8  -     YSrCa2Cu4O8
161  -     YTm0.SBa2Cu307  -     YTm0.SBa2Cu307
162  -     Zn2MgO3  -     Zn2MgO3
163  -     Zn3MgO4  -     Zn3MgO4
164  -     ZnMgO2  -     ZnMgO2
165  -     ZrBa9Cu10O20  -     ZrBa9Cu10O20
166  -     ZrNCl6  -     ZrNCl6
167  -     ZrTe5  -     ZrTe5
168  -      C6Li3Ca2          -       C6Li3Ca2
169  -      Nb3Ge              -       Nb3Ge
170  -      LiFeAs              -       LiFeAs
171  -      NaFeAs             -      NaFeAs
172  -      CeFeAsOF         -       CeFeAsOF
173  -      ErFeAsO           -       ErFeAsO
174  -      NdFeAsF           -       NdFeAsF
175  -      GdFeAsO          -       GdFeAsO
176  -      SrSmFeAsF       -       SrSmFeAsF



List from SuperConductors.org

http://www.superconductors.org/50plus.htm

Superconductors.org wrote:Planar Weight Disparity:  Essential to HTSC?
Over 140 New Superconductors Lend Strong Support

15 October 2011
Last revision: Sept. 2017
Superconductors.ORG

      Superconductors.ORG herein reports more than 140 new superconductors have now been discovered since planar weight disparity (PWD) was found to be a key component of high temperature superconductivity in 2005 (list at page bottom). This suggests strongly that PWD is not just a Tc-enhancement mechanism, but an essential component of high temperature superconductivity in the copper-oxides.

Wikipedia's List
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_superconductors
--------
The table below shows some of the parameters of common superconductors of simple structure. X:Y means material X doped with element Y, TC is the highest reported transition temperature in kelvin and HC is a critical magnetic field in tesla. "BCS" means whether or not the superconductivity is explained within the BCS theory.

No Element
1 Al
2 Cd
3 Diamond:B
4 Ga
5 Hf
6 α-Hg
7 β-Hg
8 In
9 Ir
10 α-La
11 β-La
12 Mo
13 Nb
14 Os
15 Pa
16 Pb
17 Re
18 Ru
19 Si:B
20 Sn
21 Ta
22 Tc
23 α-Th
24 Ti
25 Tl
26 α-U
27 β-U
28 V
29 α-W
30 β-W
31 Zn
32 Zr
33 Ba8Si46
34 C6Ca
35 C6Li3Ca2
36 C8K
37 C8KHg
38 C6K
39 C3K
40 C3Li
41 C2Li
42 C3Na
43 C2Na
44 C8Rb
45 C6Sr
46 C6Yb
47 C60Cs2Rb
48 C60K3
49 C60RbX
50 43135
51 InN
52 In2O3
53 LaB6
54 MgB2
55 Nb3Al
56 Nb3Ge
57 NbO
58 NbN
59 Nb3Sn
60 NbTi
61 SiC:B
62 SiC:Al
63 TiN
64 YB6
65 ZrN
66 ZrB12


Last edited by Cr6 on Sun Jun 24, 2018 11:11 pm; edited 55 times in total

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Re: Partial List of Superconductors to Build Out

Post by Cr6 on Wed Apr 18, 2018 8:53 pm


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Re: Partial List of Superconductors to Build Out

Post by Nevyn on Wed Apr 18, 2018 9:32 pm

I've been thinking about building molecules and I had a brief thought about specifying a molecular language. Something that allows the user to easily define the atoms and bonds in a molecule textually and also easy enough for me to then build a molecule from it. That would not work for all molecules, because some of them have special bonds, but it could work for these types of molecules which are fairly straight structures. Although, looking at those lists leads me to think that some of them are not so straight.

It could be as simple as B-F-Ar-F-Ar-P, for example. Maybe '-' means on the north/south axis and we could use '+' for the carousel bonds. They do get tricky because you can have up to 4 bonds at the carousel level. Maybe use parentheses to group into sub-structures when there are multiple complex parts to the molecule. I could use square brackets to denote multiple bonds to the preceding atom. For example to specify FeO3 you might use: F[-O,+O,+O] to connect one Oxygen to the top of Iron and the other 2 to the carousel level.

I initially dropped this idea because it couldn't handle very complex bonds without a very complex language, but it might be quite good for the simple things. If anyone has an opinion about it, please speak up and I will see if this is worth investigating. I like the idea of us being able to quickly generate structures for our discussions. This type of language could lead to an image server where you specify the molecule on the URL and it generates an image of it for you as opposed to a dedicated building environment like I have been thinking about. Of course, I want both so it isn't a one or the other type of situation but I might be able to get something operational a bit quicker.
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Re: Partial List of Superconductors to Build Out

Post by Cr6 on Sun Apr 29, 2018 8:00 pm

I like your notation Nevyn it is very clear.  

I was correcting the list above changing "Z" to "2" and noticed a lot of Ba2 in many of these molecules.

Here's the first post from Miles' Solid Light paper:

http://www.milesmathis.com/solidlight.pdf
Miles Mathis wrote:
In closing, I will answer one final question. Above I have said that the Meissner Effect is caused by
loss of the equatorial channel, and thereby the magnetic field. But if we lose the nuclear spin, we
should lose all conduction, shouldn't we? Since the spin is what caused charge to move through in the
first place, loss of spin should cause not only a loss of the magnetic field, but the electrical field as
well. Loss of spin should cause total loss of field potentials around the nucleus, which would negate
through charge just as much as equatorial charge. If the electrical field is lost, how can we have
superconduction?

Well, in a sense, we don't. Superconduction turns out to be a bit of a misnomer. Without nuclear spin,
the nucleus is no longer conducting at all, rigorously. It is only continuing to provide a path, given by
the nuclear structure, but the nuclear vortices are gone. The nucleus is no longer driving charge
through, it is now only allowing charge through. The driving force of the conduction must be supplied
by the incoming current itself. Remember, a superconductor is providing no resistance to a given
charge stream or ion stream. But we have to supply the current from outside. A superconductor can't
create its own current from an unstructured external field, as a normal conductor can. A
superconductor can only provide a zero-resistant path for a pre-existing structured field.


Wikipedia style coverage of the History of Superconductors (explains BCS theory). Miles pretty much trashes this material in the Solid Light paper:
http://www.superconductors.org/history.htm

HgBaCaCuO (Oxide version)
http://www.freepatentsonline.com/5858926.html

Notes:
The reason Russian compounds didn't work, it was speculated, was that the charge of the copper was too small. Jean Tholence explained to me that it is an empirical rule of thumb that the charge of the copper must be around 2.3 to have superconductivity. The first idea was to reduce yttrium, to make HgBa2CuO, which was found to be superconducting at 98 Kelvin. The second idea was to replace yttrium with calcium to raise the valence of the copper. Introducing calcium gave a new family of mercury compounds. The compounds are made up of mercury, barium, calcium, and copper oxides of the general form HgBa2Ca"-'Cu"O, where n=l, 2, 3. This yields the following shorthand, Hg-1201, Hg-1212, and Hg-1223, denoting the number of calcium atoms and copper oxide layers in the compounds. The latter two were found to be superconducting at 128 K and 135 K, which was confirmed by a research team in Zurich. These are the three mercury compounds that have been isolated and studied so far, although others are known to exist. "We now have phases with Hg-1234, Hg-1245," Tholence told me, "but up to now the Tc is not optimized. " For compounds with higher numbers of copper-oxygen layers, the Tc seems to decrease somewhat. For example, the phase Hg-1256 could have a Tc,around 100 K. As a group, these mercury compounds lead the pack of other superconductors with the highest Tc of any copperoxide layered compound of two or three layers. James Jorgensen, a researcher at Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois, who has been following ithis work with interest, observes that "the remarkable thing in these new compounds is that their structures are really very simple, simpler than the thallium and bismuth structures that previously held the record for the highest critical temperatures. "
(Note this is just an old link I found at this site with this paper cited. )
http://www.larouchepub.com/eiw/public/1994/eirv21n19-19940506/eirv21n19-19940506_020-research_advances_into_mercury_c.pdf
-----------
HgBaCaCu

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Re: Partial List of Superconductors to Build Out

Post by Nevyn on Mon Apr 30, 2018 9:24 pm

I've given it a bit more thought and I think I can simplify the language while still allowing some complex structures to be defined.

The language is based on element chains which are north/south bonds denoted by the '-' bond operator. They are specified from bottom to top.
e.g. The above structure would be 'K-Hg-Ba-Cu'.

I removed the need for the '+' bonding operator by denoting carousel bonds inside of a comma separated list surrounded by '[' and ']'.
e.g. Fe[-O,-F]-C would create an Iron atom with an Oxygen atom bonded to the east and a Fluorine in the west carousel position '[-O,-F]' and Carbon bonded to the north position.

Each of the carousel items can be an element chain itself.
e.g. Fe[-O-H,-O-H]

The list is in the following order: east, west, front, back. If you don't want to use a certain position, then you can use the null operator '_'.
e.g. Fe[_,-F]-C would not have any atom in the carousel east position but has a Fluorine in the west.

Carousel atoms are turned 90° so that their bottom hook is bonded to the carousel of the preceding atom. I may use another bond operator to stop the turning and let things bond carousel to carousel. I'm not sure if that is needed at the moment. We might also have to specify whether we want to bond to the bottom or the top of the atom. We might need that in general, actually. I might introduce a flipping operator '!'.
e.g. !K-Hg-Ba-!Cu would cause the K and Cu atoms to be flipped 180°.

You can multiply part of a chain using the '(' and ')' operators followed by the number of times you want it repeated.
e.g. K-Hg-(Ba-Fe)3-P would expand into K-Hg-Ba-Fe-Ba-Fe-Ba-Fe-P.

That should allow some fairly complex molecules but would not be very good for big structures like the building blocks of DNA. I'll have a play with it and see how it goes.
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Re: Partial List of Superconductors to Build Out

Post by Cr6 on Mon Apr 30, 2018 11:33 pm

Sounds like a good approach Nevyn. I'll try to flesh out a few this way and post the code next to each structure.

Quick note on ZrTe5:

The scientists found that (1) the appearance of superconductivity at the critical pressure is accompanied by the complete suppression of the high temperature resistance anomaly around 128 K, showing a structural transition from the Cmcm to C2/m space group, and (2) that at pressures above 21.2 GPa, a second superconducting phase with P-1 space group structure manifests and coexists with the original C2/m. (In mathematics and physics, a space group is the symmetry group of a configuration in space, usually in three dimensions.) "The superconductivity often appears in compounds which are close to a structural, magnetic, or electronic instability (as Miles has pointed out...) . More recent investigations have revealed that the high temperature resistance anomaly around 128 K is caused by temperature induced Lifshitz transition, in which the Fermi surface undergoes a change in topology and a drastic change in the electronic density of states." In their study, the team demonstrated that the appearance of superconductivity at the critical pressure is accompanied by the complete suppression of the resistance anomaly and a structural transition indicates that both electronic and structural instabilities are responsible for the observed superconductivity.
https://phys.org/news/2016-03-cool-pressure-superconductivity-3d-dirac.html

Related:

Scientists pinpoint energy flowing through vibrations in superconducting crystals


Manipulating the flow of energy through superconductors could radically transform technology, perhaps leading to applications such as ultra-fast, highly efficient quantum computers. But these subtle dynamics—including heat dispersion—play out with absurd speed across dizzying subatomic structures.

Now, scientists have tracked never-before-seen interactions between electrons and the crystal lattice structure of copper-oxide superconductors. The collaboration, led by scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory, achieved measurement precision faster than one trillionth of one second through a groundbreaking combination of experimental techniques.

"This breakthrough offers direct, fundamental insight into the puzzling characteristics of these remarkable materials," said Brookhaven Lab scientist Yimei Zhu, who led the research. "We already had evidence of how lattice vibrations impact electron activity and disperse heat, but it was all through deduction. Now, finally, we can see it directly."

The results, published April 27 in the journal Science Advances, could advance research into powerful, fleeting phenomena found in copper oxides—including high-temperature superconductivity—and help scientists engineer new, better-performing materials.

"We found a nuanced atomic landscape, where certain high-frequency, 'hot' vibrations within the superconductor rapidly absorb energy from electrons and increase in intensity," said first author Tatiana Konstantinova, a Ph.D. student at Stony Brook University doing her thesis work at Brookhaven Lab. "Other sections of the lattice, however, were slow to react. Seeing this kind of tiered interaction transforms our understanding of copper oxides."

Scientists used ultra-fast electron diffraction and photoemission spectroscopy to observe changes in electron energy and momentum as well as fluctuations in the atomic structure.

Other collaborating institutions include SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, North Carolina State University, Georgetown University, and the University of Duisburg-Essen in Germany.

Vibrations through a crystalline tree

The team chose Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8, a well-known superconducting copper oxide that exhibits the strong interactions central to the study. Even at temperatures close to absolute zero, the crystalline atomic lattice vibrates and very slight pulses of energy can cause the vibrations to increase in amplitude.

"These atomic vibrations are regimented and discrete, meaning they divide across specific frequencies," Zhu said. "We call vibrations with specific frequencies 'phonons,' and their interactions with flowing electrons were our target."

(more at link... https://phys.org/news/2018-04-scientists-energy-vibrations-superconducting-crystals.html  )

---------

Strained materials make cooler superconductors
April 24, 2018 by Sam Million-Weaver, University of Wisconsin-Madison


"Strain is one of the knobs we can turn to create materials with desirable properties, so it is important to learn to manipulate its effects," says Dane Morgan, the Harvey D. Spangler Professor of materials science and engineering at UW-Madison and a senior author on the paper. "These findings might also help explain some puzzling results in strained materials."
...
"The prevailing opinion has been that strain makes it thermodynamically easier for oxygen defects that destroy the superconducting properties to form in the material, but we have shown that differences in the kinetic time scales of oxygen-defect formation between tensile and compressive strain is a key mechanism," says Ryan Jacobs, a staff scientist in Morgan's laboratory and a co-first author on the paper.

Oxygen defects are important because the amount of oxygen contained within a material can alter its critical temperature.
The most obvious idea was that strain might impact properties by adjusting how much energy is needed for oxygen defects to appear.

(more at link... https://phys.org/news/2018-04-strained-materials-cooler-superconductors.html  )

...


Method enables material to carry more electrical current without resistance at a higher temperature
October 6, 2016, Brookhaven National Laboratory

"Some ions or energies may cause large enough damage to interfere with superconductivity, while others may not produce any effect at all," explained coauthor Toshinori Ozaki, a former scientist in Brookhaven Lab's Advanced Energy Materials Group who is now a faculty member at Japan's Kwansei Gakuin University. "So we run simulations to figure out what combination should produce the optimal defect—one that can hold down the magnetic vortices without negatively impacting the material's superconducting properties."

In the case of the iron-based material the team studied, low-energy protons did the trick. Using electron microscopes, the scientists took images of the thin films (about 100 nanometers thick) of the material they prepared, before and after they hit the films with low-energy protons.

"Throughout the irradiated films, we saw individual chains of defects created by the collisions between the incident ions and nucleus that broke the perfect atomic order, causing the lattice to locally compress or stretch out," said coauthor Lijun Wu, a materials scientist at Brookhaven who led the microscopy work.

(more at link... https://phys.org/news/2016-10-method-enables-material-electrical-current.html  )

----------

A different spin on superconductivity—Unusual particle interactions open up new possibilities in exotic materials
April 7, 2018, University of Maryland

Finding that YPtBi was a superconductor surprised the researchers in the first place. Most superconductors start out as reasonably good conductors, with a lot of mobile electrons—an ingredient that YPtBi is lacking. According to the conventional theory, YPtBi would need about a thousand times more mobile electrons in order to become superconducting at temperatures below 0.8 Kelvin. And yet, upon cooling the material to this temperature, the team saw superconductivity happen anyway. This was a first sign that something exotic was going on inside this material.
...
For now, many open questions remain, including how such pairing could occur in the first place. "When you have this high-spin pairing, what's the glue that holds these pairs together?" says Paglione. "There are some ideas of what might be happening, but fundamental questions remain-which makes it even more fascinating."

(more at link.... https://phys.org/news/2018-04-superconductivityunusual-particle-interactions-possibilities-exotic.html  )


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Re: Partial List of Superconductors to Build Out

Post by Cr6 on Tue May 01, 2018 12:03 am

YBiPt which is kind of interesting CF wise as the carousels look balanced except for N/S between them .. Y is most the unbalanced one like Bi shoots charge through Pt with the channel hooks that ends in a weaker Y that then hooks the N/S with others? :



Could Mercury be switched out with Bi in this arrangement? Or would the carousels not properly stack the charge N/S without a Barium or Calcium -- or something without a full carousel (maybe multiple Y3 or something similar )...?  Mercury has two alpha-hooks while Bismuth doesn't...


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Re: Partial List of Superconductors to Build Out

Post by Cr6 on Tue May 01, 2018 12:32 am

ZrTe5 (Surprised Zr isn't involved in more SC discoveries)



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Re: Partial List of Superconductors to Build Out

Post by Cr6 on Tue May 01, 2018 12:45 am

How might this stack?
ZrNCl6
This looks like Zr-N-C-I6...


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Re: Partial List of Superconductors to Build Out

Post by Nevyn on Tue May 01, 2018 12:50 am

I would say that Platinum is more like Mercury. Pt has a denser core but less on the carousel level. I'm not sure how that dense core effects super-conductivity. The N/S hook stacks are the same for each element though, which makes it easier to replace one with the other.

Yttrium is a strange beast. No hook stack on the south position which makes it difficult to bond with other elements. You could bond the 5 proton stack on the south of Bismuth to the bottom of Yttrium such that they share that 5 proton stack. The core of Yttrium doesn't really want that much charge, but Bismuth can handle it with ease.

My guess at YPtBi would be to use Y to sit between Bi and Pt. This gives us 4 proton stacks on the north and south position of the molecule and keeps all bonding stacks at 5 protons. The N/S 4 proton stacks of the molecule pull in enough charge to saturate Y without blowing it apart. If we put that 5 proton stack of Bi on the outside then it would pull in too much charge for Y.

In my Molecular Bonding Language (MBL) it would look like this: !Bi-Y-Pt and I don't see any problem with !Bi-Y-Hg.
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Re: Partial List of Superconductors to Build Out

Post by Cr6 on Tue May 01, 2018 12:59 am

Okay I see your point. In my understanding I thought that the stacking would be Pt-BI-Y making CF from heavier to lighter structures (Y) on the North end. Almost like a triangular shape. But I guess, Y would be more like Ba in this example? The goal is "instability" as they mentioned in the research which is to limit the carousel CF in terms of Miles.


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Re: Partial List of Superconductors to Build Out

Post by Nevyn on Tue May 01, 2018 1:00 am

Strange that there is only 1 Zr but 5 Te. I thought it should be the other way around. Te can certainly bond to itself in those N/S positions and the connection points between Zr and Te would have 3 protons in each stack. The Te to Te bonds would have 4.

(Te)2-Zr-(Te)3

These molecules seem to have balanced N/S stacks. Miles states that an unbalanced N to S creates conduction but super-conductivity is not conduction, it is the loss of resistance. So I'm not sure if we still need the unbalanced stack sizes or if we can balance them. I don't see any reason not the be able to balance them, although it does allow charge flow in both directions. Maybe the fact that there are an odd number of one side and an even number on the other side of the central atom is enough to cause a direction for charge flow.
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Re: Partial List of Superconductors to Build Out

Post by Nevyn on Tue May 01, 2018 1:06 am

ZrNCl6: N-(Cl)3-Zr-(Cl)3 Not sure about flipping any of those elements.
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Re: Partial List of Superconductors to Build Out

Post by Nevyn on Tue May 01, 2018 1:14 am

Well I think this little discussion has shown the usefulness of MBL. If I had it implemented now we could be looking at these molecules rather than having to imagine them.

As a first cut, I will be implementing a web page that allows you to enter the MBL and it will generate the molecule for you using the AtomicViewer graphics code. In the long run, I would like a server that allows you to specify the MBL on the URL and it returns an image of the molecule. I realised that this requires re-coding the graphics into another language which I could use on the server. It is possible to use Javascript, through Node.js, but I prefer other languages for server-side coding. My server also does not have a graphics card, so I have to deal with that too. A web page and an image export function will get us by.

Did you know that you can press the 'P' key to save an image in AtomicViewer?
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Re: Partial List of Superconductors to Build Out

Post by Cr6 on Tue May 01, 2018 1:15 am

Well Nevyn, for the MBL that would be really cool!

Nevyn wrote:Did you know that you can press the 'P' key to save an image in AtomicViewer?
Didn't know that, I'll use it. Smile

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Re: Partial List of Superconductors to Build Out

Post by Cr6 on Thu May 03, 2018 1:09 am

Just wanted to post this link on Iron-based SCs:

-------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron-based_superconductor

Much of the interest is because the new compounds are very different from the cuprates and may help lead to a theory of non-BCS-theory superconductivity.

More recently these have been called the ferropnictides. The first ones found belong to the group of oxypnictides. Some of the compounds have been known since 1995,[6] and their semiconductive properties have been known and patented since 2006.[7]
...

A subset of iron-based superconductors with properties similar to the oxypnictides, known as the 122 iron arsenides, attracted attention in 2008 due to their relative ease of synthesis.

Wikipedia wrote:The crystalline material, known chemically as LaOFeAs, stacks iron and arsenic layers, where the electrons flow, between planes of lanthanum and oxygen. Replacing up to 11 percent of the oxygen with fluorine improved the compound — it became superconductive at 26 kelvin, the team reports in the March 19, 2008 Journal of the American Chemical Society. Subsequent research from other groups suggests that replacing the lanthanum in LaOFeAs with other rare earth elements such as cerium, samarium, neodymium and praseodymium leads to superconductors that work at 52 kelvin.[5]

LaOFeAs



Fluorine (F)



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Re: Partial List of Superconductors to Build Out

Post by Cr6 on Thu May 03, 2018 1:26 am

La-substitutes:
--------



.....

Coexistence of Superconductivity and Antiferromagnetism in (Li0.8Fe0.2) OHFeSe

Published: March 01, 2015
Author(s)
X. F. Lu, N. Z. Wang, Hui Wu, Y. P. Wu, D. Zhao, X. Z. Zeng, X. G. Luo, T. Wu, W. Bao, G. H. Zhang, F. Q. Huang, Qingzhen Huang, X. H. Chen

Abstract

FeSe-derived superconductors show some unique behaviors relative to iron-pnictide superconductors, which are very helpful to understand the mechanism of superconductivity in high-Tc iron-based superconductors. The low-energy electronic structure of the heavily electron-doped AxFe2Se2 (A=K, Rb, Cs) deomonstrates that interband scattering or Fermi surface nesting is not a necessary ingredient for the unconventional superconductivity in iron-based superconductors. The superconducting transition temperature (Tc) in the one-unite-cell FeSe on SrTiO3 substrate can reach as high as ~65 K, largely transcending the bulk Tc of all known iron-based superconductors. However, in the case of AxFe2Se2, the inter-grown antiferromagnetic insulating phase makes it difficult to study the underlying physics. Superconductors of alkali metal ions and NH3 molecules or organic-molecules intercalated FeSe and single layer or thin film FeSe on SrTiO3 substrate are extremely air-sensitive, which prevents the further investigation of their physical properties. Therefore, it is urgent to find a stable and accessible FeSe-derived superconductor for physical property measurements so as to study the underlying mechanism of superconductivity. Here, we report the air-stable superconductor (Li0.8Fe0.2)OHFeSe with high temperature superconductivity at ~40 K synthesized by a novel hydrothermal method. The crystal structure is unambiguously determined by the combination of X-ray and neutron powder diffraction and nuclear magnetic resonance. It is also found that an antiferromagnetic order coexists with superconductivity in such new FeSe-derived superconductor. This novel synthetic route opens a new avenue for exploring other superconductors in the related systems. The combination of different structure characterization techniques helps to complementarily determine and understand the details of the complicated structures.
Citation: Nature Materials
Volume: 14

https://www.nist.gov/publications/coexistence-superconductivity-and-antiferromagnetism-li08fe02-ohfese

...........

https://arxiv.org/pdf/1504.04436.pdf

Electronic Structure and Superconductivity of FeSe-Related Superconductors

Xu Liu1, Lin Zhao1, Shaolong He1, Junfeng He1, Defa Liu1, Daixiang
Mou1, Bing Shen1, Yong Hu1, Jianwei Huang1 and X. J. Zhou1;2;
1National Lab for Superconductivity,
Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics,
Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China
2Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing, China
(Dated: November 24, 2014)

Abstract

The FeSe superconductor and its related systems have attracted much attention in the iron-based
superconductors owing to their simple crystal structure and peculiar electronic and physical prop-
erties. The bulk FeSe superconductor has a superconducting transition temperature (Tc) of 8 K;
it can be dramatically enhanced to 37 K at high pressure. On the other hand, its cousin system,
FeTe, possesses a unique antiferromagnetic ground state but is non-superconducting. Substitution
of Se by Te in the FeSe superconductor results in an enhancement of Tc up to 14.5 K and super-
conductivity can persist over a large composition range in the Fe(Se,Te) system. Intercalation of
the FeSe superconductor leads to the discovery of the AxFe2-ySe2 (A=K, Cs and Tl) system that
exhibits a Tc higher than 30 K and a unique electronic structure of the superconducting phase.
The latest report of possible high temperature superconductivity in the single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3
films with a Tc above 65 K has generated much excitement in the community. This pioneering
work opens a door for interface superconductivity to explore for high Tc superconductors. The
distinct electronic structure and superconducting gap, layer-dependent behavior and insulator-
superconductor transition of the FeSe/SrTiO3 films provide critical information in understanding
the superconductivity mechanism of the iron-based superconductors. In this paper, we present
a brief review on the investigation of the electronic structure and superconductivity of the FeSe
superconductor and related systems, with a particular focus on the FeSe films.

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Re: Partial List of Superconductors to Build Out

Post by Cr6 on Thu May 03, 2018 1:39 am

Paper Conclusions
● Single-layer FeSe has a much simpler structure, but is likely to
have one of highest Tc ’s of the Fe-based superconductors
● Measurements show lack of a hole-like Fermi surface at gamma
point and a nodeless, isotropic superconducting gap
● Current theories for the superconducting mechanism need to be
modified to describe all the results presented in this paper


https://courses.physics.illinois.edu/phys596/fa2013/StudentWork/Team1_final.pdf
......


FeSe



SrTiO(3)




The cause of high Tc superconductivity at the interface between FeSe and SrTiO3

May 9, 2016, Science China Press
https://phys.org/news/2016-05-high-tc-superconductivity-interface-fese.html



The temperature above which a superconductor turns into a normal conductor is called the superconducting transition temperature. Raising it to a point enabling practical applications is a dream in modern science and technology. In 1987, a superconductor with a transition temperature above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen was discovered. Today, several families of closely related superconducting compounds (some with even higher transition temperatures) are known. They are called the "cuprates," as they're built from copper oxides.

......

Influence of the Fluoride Atoms Doping on the FeSe Superconductor

A. D. Bortolozo1,2, A. D. Gueiros1, L. M. S. Alves1, C. A. M. dos Santos1
1Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais, Escola de Engenharia de Lorena—USP, Lorena, Brazil; 2Universidade Federal de Itajubá, Campus de Itabira, Itabira, Brazil.
Email: ausdinirbortolozo@unifei.edu.br
Received March 29th, 2012; revised May 2nd, 2012; accepted July 3rd, 2012

ABSTRACT

It is reported the influence of the interstitial atoms doping on the FeSe superconductor. Polycrystalline samples with FeSeFx and FeSeBx nominal compositions were prepared by solid state reaction. An enhancement of the superconducting transition temperature was observed in the temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity curve to the FeSeF0.015 sample. R(T) data display superconducting behavior close to 12 K. The Tc increased with F doping by up to 50%. In contrast, boron doping no change the superconducting properties of the FeSe compound. As the FeSe1–xTex system the fluoride doping introduce a negative chemical pressure in the FeSe superconductor. This fact suggests that fluoride doping have changed the electronic properties of the FeSe phase.
....
Here we report the influence of interstitial doping on the FeSe superconduc-tor. We found that the FeSe + 0.5% FeF3 shows super-conducting transition like Fe (SeTe) solid solution. On the other hand, the low content boron atoms doping do not change the electric and magnetic properties of FeSe su-perconductor.

http://file.scirp.org/pdf/MSA20120900007_85314801.pdf

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Re: Partial List of Superconductors to Build Out

Post by Nevyn on Thu May 03, 2018 9:18 pm

I have create a new topic for discussion about MBL and a formal declaration of the language and its syntax:

http://milesmathis.forumotion.com/t464-molecular-bonding-language
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Re: Partial List of Superconductors to Build Out

Post by Nevyn on Wed May 16, 2018 1:19 am

Let's start using this new language!

Formula: ZrNCl6
MBL: (Cl)3-N-Zr-(Cl)3
URL: https://www.nevyns-lab.com/mathis/app/mbl/mbl.html?mbl=(Cl)3-N-Zr-(Cl)3&align=X&atom=nucleus


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Re: Partial List of Superconductors to Build Out

Post by Nevyn on Wed May 16, 2018 1:22 am

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Re: Partial List of Superconductors to Build Out

Post by Nevyn on Wed May 16, 2018 2:07 am

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Re: Partial List of Superconductors to Build Out

Post by Nevyn on Wed May 16, 2018 2:22 am

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