Partial List of Superconductors to Build Out

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Re: Partial List of Superconductors to Build Out

Post by Nevyn on Wed May 16, 2018 2:40 am

All of these are open for discussion. They are just my quick guesses. I'm looking at the bonds and deciding if the number of protons is OK and trying to keep lo-hi-lo numbers across the chain. The outer stacks I try to make unbalanced, but am not too concerned if they are not.
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Re: Partial List of Superconductors to Build Out

Post by Cr6 Yesterday at 2:24 am

Quick plug on Graphene:
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Rare element to provide better material for high-speed electronics
May 24, 2018 by Kayla Wiles, Purdue University


Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-05-rare-element-material-high-speed-electronics.html#jCp

Purdue researchers have discovered a new two-dimensional material, derived from the rare element tellurium, to make transistors that carry a current better throughout a computer chip.

The discovery adds to a list of extremely thin, two-dimensional materials that engineers have tried to use for improving the operation speed of a chip's transistors, which then allows information to be processed faster in electronic devices, such as phones and computers, and defense technologies like infrared sensors.

Other two-dimensional materials, such as graphene, black phosphorus and silicene, have lacked either stability at room temperature or the feasible production approaches required to nanomanufacture effective transistors for higher speed devices.

"All transistors need to send a large current, which translates to high-speed electronics," said Peide Ye, Purdue's Richard J. and Mary Jo Schwartz Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. "One-dimensional wires that currently make up transistors have very small cross sections. But a two-dimensional material, acting like a sheet, can send a current over a wider surface area."

Tellurene, a two-dimensional film researchers found in the element tellurium, achieves a stable, sheet-like transistor structure with faster-moving "carriers—meaning electrons and the holes they leave in their place. Despite tellurium's rarity, the pros of tellurene would make transistors made from two-dimensional materials easier to produce on a larger scale. The researchers detail their findings in Nature Electronics.


Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-05-rare-element-material-high-speed-electronics.html#jCp

https://phys.org/news/2018-05-rare-element-material-high-speed-electronics.html#nRlv

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One-atom-thick sheets of carbon—known as graphene—have a range of electronic properties that scientists are investigating for potential use in novel devices. Graphene's optical properties are also garnering attention, which may increase further as a result of research from the A*STAR Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE). Bing Wang of the IMRE and his co-workers have demonstrated that the interactions of single graphene sheets in certain arrays allow efficient control of light at the nanoscale.

Light squeezed between single graphene sheets can propagate more efficiently than along a single sheet. Wang notes this could have important applications in optical-nanofocusing and in superlens imaging of nanoscale objects. In conventional optical instruments, light can be controlled only by structures that are about the same scale as its wavelength, which for optical light is much greater than the thickness of graphene. By utilizing surface plasmons, which are collective movements of electrons at the surface of electrical conductors such as graphene, scientists can focus light to the size of only a few nanometers.

Wang and his co-workers calculated the theoretical propagation of surface plasmons in structures consisting of single-atomic sheets of graphene, separated by an insulating material. For small separations of around 20 nanometers, they found that the surface plasmons in the graphene sheets interacted such that they became 'coupled' (see image). This theoretical coupling was very strong, unlike that found in other materials, and greatly influenced the propagation of light between the graphene sheets.



Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2012-12-theoretical-numerical-graphene-sheets-reveals.html#jCp

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