Copper's Surprising Reaction to Strong Magnets

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Copper's Surprising Reaction to Strong Magnets

Post by LongtimeAirman on Sat Apr 21, 2018 12:05 am

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Seeing a falling magnet stop before it hits a copper surface is surprising. I was aware that when a magnet is dropped through a copper pipe the magnet slows down. This video shows that effect and more.

Can someone take a shot at explaining this behavior using the charge field?

Toward the end of the video the author includes an in content video advertising plug for his producer, https://www.Brilliant.org/NightHawk; oh well, progress.

Copper's Surprising Reaction to Strong Magnets | Force Field Motion Dampening
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sENgdSF8ppA

NightHawkInLight
Published on Jan 26, 2018
In this video I experiment with Lenz's Law And Faraday's Law of Induction to generate electricity and magnetic force fields in copper. Check out my sponsor Brilliant for a really fun way to learn!
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Re: Copper's Surprising Reaction to Strong Magnets

Post by Ciaolo on Sat Apr 21, 2018 3:24 am

During the video the guy said that the copper gets warm during these near-collisions.

Since we know that heat is the density of charge in a certain area, we can say that this interaction has to do with the charge channeling in the copper. The magnet charge is redirected by the copper plate right where it came from.

Any suggestion for the wire experiments?

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Re: Copper's Surprising Reaction to Strong Magnets

Post by LongtimeAirman on Sat Apr 21, 2018 4:50 pm

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Ciaolo wrote. During the video the guy said that the copper gets warm during these near-collisions.

Since we know that heat is the density of charge in a certain area, we can say that this interaction has to do with the charge channeling in the copper. The magnet charge is redirected by the copper plate right where it came from.


Airman. True, heat is a function of charge density and charge channeling. The same object may vary greatly in heat output. The guy said that the copper gets warmer with each motion of the magnet, but by such a small amount that measuring the change in temperature would be very difficult. I don't know if he felt any additional warmth or not, or if he did he may have been warming the copper plate with his own repeated contacts.

I don't understand how your "the magnet charge is redirected by the copper plate right where it came from” idea works? How can that explain another surprising example from the video.  

The gentleman is turning a magnet with his fingers on the copper plate surface. A lone magnet on the wooden foot of the jig a fair distance away is turning along at the same rate. The copper plate is “motion dampening” the response between the two magnets. The gentleman’s hand holding the copper plate seems insignificant. How is “the magnet charge is redirected by the copper plate right where it came from”?

Ciaolo wrote. Any suggestion for the wire experiments?
Airman. I’m sorry, you’ve lost me. What are you referring to?
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Re: Copper's Surprising Reaction to Strong Magnets

Post by Ciaolo on Sun Apr 22, 2018 4:07 am

Wow, I totally missed that!

It’s amazing but I can’t say much since we don’t know what happens when those bodies are moved.

About the wire, I was referring at the 3 experiments starting at 1:50.

About heat, once the charge density in the area gets back to normal, there is no more warmth. I think the slowing down of the magnet is accompanied by heat, and when it stops, the heat goes away.

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Re: Copper's Surprising Reaction to Strong Magnets

Post by LongtimeAirman on Mon Apr 23, 2018 3:19 pm

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Ciaolo wrote. Any suggestion for the wire experiments?
Airman. Hey Ciaolo, thanks for asking and clarifying. A question that simple demands an elaborate answer. Please refer to the images and text I threw together so I need not complicate it further.



There’s really nothing new here, the only novelty is seeing such clear demonstrations. I think they’re wonderful. NightHawkInLight is careful to point out that the behavior of the magnets and copper is not based on attraction or repulsion, it is explained entirely by resistance to a changing magnetic field as described by Lenz’s and Faraday’s Laws of Induction. These facts have been known for more than two hundred years.
NightHawkInLight wrote.

In this video I experiment with Lenz's Law And Faraday's Law of Induction to generate electricity and magnetic force fields in copper. …

To read more about Lenz & Faraday's Laws see the following links:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lenz%27s_law
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faraday%27s_law_of_induction
Here they are:
Lenz's law (pronounced /ˈlɛnts/), named after the physicist Heinrich Friedrich Emil Lenz who formulated it in 1834,[1] states that the direction of current induced in a conductor by a changing magnetic field due to induction is such that it creates a magnetic field that opposes the change that produced it.
Faraday's law of induction is a basic law of electromagnetism predicting how a magnetic field will interact with an electric circuit to produce an electromotive force (EMF)—a phenomenon called electromagnetic induction. It is the fundamental operating principle of transformers, inductors, and many types of electrical motors, generators and solenoids.
NightHawkInLight showed an electrical current was created by the magnet’s descent through the coil, sufficient to briefly illuminate a light emitting diode connected between the coils’ wire ends. I agree that the magnet and coil demonstration is the defining example of electrical generation. At hydroelectric dams, electricity is generated by using high pressure water to push magnetic rotors through copper coils. Power plants burn fuel in engines to create rotary motion and so push magnets through copper coils. The electric industry has maximized efficiency in electricity creation and delivery.

I can’t imagine coming up with a new wire experiment that the electric industry hasn’t already tried many times. Instead, I’m wondering if Lenz’s or Faraday’s Laws of Induction are somehow wrong; should those Laws explicitly include the charge field?

Ciaolo wrote.  About heat, once the charge density in the area gets back to normal, there is no more warmth. I think the slowing down of the magnet is accompanied by heat, and when it stops, the heat goes away.
Airman. I agree.
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