The Mechanism of Stacked Spins

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The Mechanism of Stacked Spins

Post by jacksoncapper on Sat Nov 24, 2018 3:24 am

What is the reason a spinning b-photon would begin to spin about an origin at its surface after a collision? Intuitively, I thought it was due to the velocity of one side of the b-photon being unable to exceed c, and therefore spinning about the subsequent axes as the only means to conserve velocity. Is there a general theory or consensus on this?

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Re: The Mechanism of Stacked Spins

Post by LongtimeAirman on Sat Nov 24, 2018 5:07 pm

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Spin Stacking. "Is there a general theory or consensus on this? ". I believe Nevyn is our resident expert, but if you’re requesting that we take pop quizzes - Ok. There’s always a benefit in trying to explain what one doesn’t know best.

My paraphrasing with no review response. A photon is traveling at light speed. It cannot go any faster, you cannot add to the photon’s forward velocity. Yet there is still a way for the photon to add energy, and that’s through spin. If the energy of an un-spinning light speed particle amounts to 1, then that same particle – with spin (with light speed spin velocity) - will have an energy that amounts to 8. The spinning photon is still not prevented from doubling its energy state by an end-over-end stacked spin.

Feel free to share.
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Last edited by LongtimeAirman on Sat Nov 24, 2018 5:17 pm; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : Added light speed spin)

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Re: The Mechanism of Stacked Spins

Post by jacksoncapper on Sun Nov 25, 2018 9:02 pm

Do the spin stacks necessarily stack in an order x, y, and z axes, or can spin stacks be ordered in say x, y, x, y?

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Re: The Mechanism of Stacked Spins

Post by LongtimeAirman on Sun Nov 25, 2018 11:15 pm

Do the spin stacks necessarily stack in an order x, y, and z axes, or can spin stacks be ordered in say x, y, x, y?
Short answers: no and no. Long answers follow.  

Spins don’t necessarily stack in x, y and z order. The rule is that each new stacked spin axis must be orthogonal to the previous (or top-level) spin axis. That means that our b-photon must have an axial spin before it can add its first end-over–end stacked spin. If we align the axial spin of A in the y direction, then the new stacked spin must be orthogonal to y - in either the x and z directions, or parallel to the xz plane. I believe any 1,2,3 repetitive pattern would be stable.

Your second question, "can spin stacks be ordered in say x, y, x, y?" is more difficult to answer. I would say no; I imagine an x,y,x,y would be a deformed series of spins; vulnerable, unstable and unbalanced.  It is exposed - missing inner spin protection from the z direction. Given the energy involved I suppose an x, y, x, y might collapse into an x,y,z - just guessing!

If you haven't already seen Nevyn’s stacked spin applications, please do so. And if you have, please let us (Nevyn) know what you think. https://www.nevyns-lab.com/ and https://www.nevyns-lab.com/science/spin-apps.php.
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